39 thoughts on “HACKED UP ANTIQUE ENGINE REBUILD

  1. Some people just need to leave things alone, what a hack job that was! Nice to see it's in the hands of someone that can fix it correctly before it was destroyed!!👍

  2. That studbaker truck looks like it came from my home state of Vermont gauther is a trash removal business up here it used to be called gauther and sons I think my gramps said back years ago when he was younger in the 1950s-1970s

  3. Great vid, now to check out all the other cool vids you have on the site… can never have to many sources of information 🙂

  4. Hey Roadking I'm not sure if you remember but a few videos ago i made mention of a 49 Chevy pickup i had i just wanted to give you a little update on it. So far we've removed all the body panels, engine and transmission and were getting ready to do the front and rear suspension!

  5. Did not read all the comments but that Farmall AV is the high crop variant of the Farmall A. I have never seen one personally but that is very cool!

  6. so no more rotary engine? i was really into that build but now never see any progress… u guys should make a lawn mower like the one randy quaid had on the movie moving. u guys have the skill. love the vids. please let me know on the rotary build.

  7. That Studebaker truck is in remarkable condition! The business next to where I grew up had a fleet of these of this vintage…all dark green. 🙂 Jack

  8. Hi Guys nice to see some different things thanks for posting the video. I don't see many cobble jobs like those rings on much older stuff here. it's just mainly worn out when I get to buy it for a project, or work on it for customers. What concerns me here is the newer stuff I do for customers some goof has played with and cobbled up. Some of this has been done by other guys in local shops. I kinda hear a few local names once in a while, put to the last repair of that part. That guy should of known better. Or been able to find out if they didn't know, or got replacement parts easily if they could of been bothered as well sometimes .

  9. That's crazy about the 0.250" ring in the 0.375 groove! You would have thought that someone would have had more common sense than to do that – but then again…..

  10. Ah that`ll do won`t do ! Do it right the first time. You just proved this. What a lousy thing to do to an antique engine, they could have written this one off with this kind of stupidity.
    Thanks for all the good `stuff`, I like these videos.

  11. Man…those rings!! Some real cool engines! I wish I had more people around me for some engine nights 😉 Great vid bud!

  12. Hey ROADKING, you said you weren't going to make a video for some reason but always make videos for us on neat old stuff like in this video. I don't know about everybody else but I always enjoy your's and the Buddies' adventures! We need to go on at least one more boat ride before it gets too cold and then I want you, Mike and the others to work on that radial engine again soon. It will be interesting to see it go together and also interesting to watch it crank up and run.

  13. Buddy, I'm still interested in what you are doing, and your videos are still well done, but the language is deteriorating to where I'm listening to you less and less. I hate it. I like what you are doing, but we don't use that kind of language in this house.

  14. And I Thought you was gonna show us a connecting rod that was welded back together !!! I like that old Truck It would be fun to take that to Home Depot and pick up a big load of Lumber

  15. Oh wow…the guy who installed those must of had been off his rocker if he thought that would last…who puts rings in like that and thinks it's ok…

    That Stude truck is a beauty and in that condition a precious gem.

  16. I don't imagine it would've run like that for long though! The only crazy stuff I've found on either of my Beetles is dodgy body-work like patches over top of older rusted-out patches, all the engines I've taken apart so far have just been old, worn-out, or poorly maintained, not jury-rigged!

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