How to clean a Briggs & Stratton Nikki carburetor on an Intek V-twin Lawn Tractor



This is part 2 of a video set describing the repair of a John Deere L-120 rider mower with a Briggs & Stratton 20 HP Intek V-twin engine. This mower had blue smoke out the exhaust and no power. This episode describes how I cleaned and reassembled the carburetor in an effort to overcome rich combustion. Before attempting this task it would be wise to obtain an overhaul seal kit for your specific carburetor.

Link to part 1 is as follows https://youtu.be/1EqMuDA9X90

This video is an amateur demonstration offered for free but with no guarantees as to accuracy or safety. Be sure to double check all pertinent information with the dealers repair manual, which can be found online for most models. Any misadventure you encounter if you decide to accept the risk of home repair is your responsibility.

Music copyright details are as follows.

Fast Talkin by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100590
Artist: http://incompetech.com/

“Book Bag” by E’s Jammy Jams taken from the free Yotube music list. CC 4.0

Walk In The Park Full by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Artist: http://audionautix.com/

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34 thoughts on “How to clean a Briggs & Stratton Nikki carburetor on an Intek V-twin Lawn Tractor

  1. Great job on this video. The detail in the presentation and the production quality were excellent. Thanks for sharing. My mower has the intek v-twin which, I assume, uses this same carburetor. All I need now is the nerve to take on the job. One thing I wondered about was whether you replaced any of the parts. I can only assume that you didn't.

  2. I have a question – if you take the fuel bowl off – with the carb still on – is there a way to get that seat to stay in ?? I have a single seat that's in the bowl now.

  3. Thank you nice job explaining what everything does, might have had some trash in the carb but there wasn't any in the vid like a lot of them have.

  4. Thanks for the great video. One of the very few reasons I continue to support YouTube is for straight forward education by fellow travelers that have more time than money, and just need to see it done correctly once. Great job.

  5. This is fantastic. Clear and concise youtube "how to's" are a rarity in a sea of garbage. Thank you for taking your time to put out a quality product.

  6. Nice video very informative. I have a similar problem with my mower, now I have some better ideas of things to check. Thanks for taking the time to share with others.

  7. excellently done, very thorough, I followed it to the letter, and still stops running after 10-20 seconds. It runs so strong with no smoke or anything unusual, just die like no fuel continually feeding carb.

  8. Today I just completed a "partial" rebuild of the Nikki V-Twin Carb. The rubber gasket "O" Ring in the fuel bowl had become swollen and the engine was puffing out black smoke and drowning in fuel so that O-Ring needed replacement. While I was at it I replaced some intake gaskets too. I didn't completely disassemble it because it was as clean as the day it was born. One note about the "jets" : They indeed did fall out but I personally didn't see any difference in size under a loupe and my Husqvarna is now running so I guess I got them in correctly. Your video was a good reference "just to make sure". Thanks for posting. BTW, $15 in parts and and some sweat equity saved me around $200+. Keep it DIY!

  9. Thanks again Mr Henry. As ever, all of your videos are excellent. Would you have a reference to the free download to a dealer repair manual please? Thanks again.

  10. Great Tutorial. There is a breather tube for the crankcase that connects to the inlet duct from the air cleaner. Not hard to imagine a dirty carb might create conditions that would suck some oil in from the breather tube to create blue smoke. This happens in car engines if you overfill the oil or have a bad PCV valve. As well, excessively rich mixture or perhaps dirt dissolve in fuel from the dirty carb, can create an excessive dense gray smoke that looks blue.

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