HOW TO REBUILD A STUART MODELS 5A STEAM ENGINE – PART #10



How To Rebuild A Stuart Models 5A Steam Engine – Part #10 – Making the eccentric sheaves, re-machining the top cylinder cover and a small amount of painting – mainly the second coat of paint. IF ANYONE WISHES TO MAKE A SMALL DONATION TOWARDS THE COST AND THE TIME THAT IT TAKES ME TO MAKE THESE VIDEOS OR BECOME A PATRON OF MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL ON “PATREON” WHICH ALSO MEANS THAT YOU RECEIVE EXTRA VIDEOS – PLEASE USE THESE LINKS: https://www.paypal.me/keithappleton
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12 thoughts on “HOW TO REBUILD A STUART MODELS 5A STEAM ENGINE – PART #10

  1. Another great video.
    Thank You.

    BTW You said in one of your other videos about SCALPELS shattering.
    I often use a scalpel for working on small parts and some of the small things I make.
    I recommend proper British Swann-Morton scalpels, blades and handles and not cheap ones. Also you may have been using the wrong shape of blade if it shattered when giving it some welly.
    I use and recommend a number 18 blade on a number 4 handle or a number 14 blade on a slightly smaller number 3 handle. You can put some pressure on those when cutting as the blades are slightly wider than the blades you might have shattered.
    The non-sterile blades are ideal for the workshop. I've only ever broken one… trying to use it as a screwdriver because I was too lazy to reach over and grab a proper screwdriver. They usually go blunt on me as I use them so much but they're cheap enough off ebay.
    Hope this helps.

  2. Mr. Appleton, JB Weld would also have been a prime choice for gluing the bolt in the cylinder cover.  Just clean the hole out with some lacquer thinner (or cellulose thinner), and apply some JB Weld to the bolt threads and screw it in place.  Let it harden and finish as you did in the video.

  3. For Mr. Appleton or any other knowledgeable person out there, this is a question from a non-machinist/modeler but an enthusiastic 'interested observer' and civil engineer involving the choice of material for the eccentric sheaves – why are these machined from cast iron as opposed to say, tool steel? I do understand that these are low load components (thus 'galling' shouldn't be an issue) but it seems that long-term durability from just rotational contact would be enhanced.

  4. Mr. Appleton,
    I'm not a Machinist and have been on the road working. When you spook about Layout Dye, I didn't understand it until I got back to the shop and asked our Machinist. He showed me a bottle of the dye but explained that it is rarely used today. What he uses is chisel point "Sharpie" pens that you can buy at any department, stationary, or hobby store very cheaply and cleans up easily with denatured alcohol.

  5. Does body filler work better for eliminating the line around the filled hole then lightly riveting the bolt before sanding it flat or is it unnecessary work when you're going to be painting it anyways?

  6. Smart man disabling the comments on your daughter's video Keith! She did a fantastic job by the way! Glad she is getting involved in your hobby

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