HOW TO REBUILD A STUART MODELS 5A STEAM ENGINE – PART #5



How To Rebuild A Stuart Models 5A Steam Engine – Part #5 – Machining the Flywheel which is shown in great detail. Lots of hints and tips for getting a good result and making sure that the flywheel is fully concentric with the centre hole and that the hole is not oversize so that it is a good fit on the crankshaft.
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27 Replies to “HOW TO REBUILD A STUART MODELS 5A STEAM ENGINE – PART #5”

  1. I respect that you may want privacy while drinking your tea, but some of your tea drinking fans might be interested in your tea. Perhaps they will get as much pleasure from watching your tea steep as they would watching the paint dry on the cast bits.
    Just a suggestion, as I'm a coffee drinker and have no interest.

  2. Thank you once again for your excellent videos. Watching tonight it occurred to me that a good few people must lose perseverance when faced with the painstaking effort that goes into so many of the parts and the flywheel is especially demanding. I admire your perseverance as much as your skill. Oh and the chuckles go down well too.

  3. I like how you drilled undersized and carefully perfected the hole size with the reamer. That tip alone was very useful.
    I have been doing it wrong all along. 🙂

  4. Yes Keith I found it to be full of good info and very helpful as I prepare to machine my first steam engine model which will be a Stuart Models kit Victoria as you so helpfully recommended to me a few weeks back thanks for making this video and all the others too,
    have a good day and a better tomorrow

  5. Of all your videos so far, this one has struck me as the most in tune with instruction for beginners, and seems to be a great source of information for turning on the lathe.

  6. Top tip: if your reamers cut big, don't clamp the tailstock to the bed and wind it through – leave it loose and physically push the tailstock to put the reamer through the hole. More of a problem on well used lathes that have worn (like the ones at work) but maybe someone will find this useful.

    Also independant 4 jaw chucks will hold work much more firmly than any self centering chuck because as you tighten them you're only tightening 1 jaw, not spreading your clamping torque between 3 or 4.

  7. Finally got around to becoming  a Patreon to you. Keep doing what you do and I hope my little bit helps. Love your videos, so informative and interesting. I am now looking for a Lathe.  🙂

  8. Those were some good tips! It hadn't occurred to me (though of course I should have realized it) that you want to judge whether the rough flywheel casting is true by the inside features where the spokes are, because those will not be machined.

    I don't know if you've ever looked at the Stuart Models pamphlet "Building a Vertical Steam Engine"; therein the author describes fabrication of a "D-Reamer" from a piece of silver steel (the US equivalent would be a piece of drill rod)
    Have you tried this?

  9. I was just thinking that I was very surprised that you didn't use a mandrel and then you used a mandrel! Is there a reason why you didn't put it on a mandrel first and then true up all the sides? Maybe it isn't as rigid that way?

  10. As someone with no machining experience, and someone who would like to eventually make an engine like this, I was wondering about order of operation. If you were to drill and ream the flywheel first, wouldn't you be able to use the mandrel to either accurately and securely clamp it in the chuck or turn it between centers? The way I've always pictured this being done would involve leveling the spokes on a drill press or milling machine bed, spotting and drilling a vertical hole, turning a mandrel with accurate centers on each end, reaming the flywheel hole to fit the mandrel, then doing all of the rest of the turning with the flywheel on the mandrel. I'm assuming that because someone with more experience, who knows how to get good results, does it completely differently than I'd visualized, there's a reason my plan won't work or will make the process harder. It's just that I'm damned if I can find what's wrong with my idea. What do you think?

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