My restored 1951 Briggs & Stratton Model “6-B-S” gas engine



Hello again YouTube, another one of my restored gas engines, this one being a 1951 Briggs & Stratton Model 6-B-S, it is a 4 cycle, with a 2″ bore, 2″ stroke, and uses a “Vacu-Jet” style carburator. The “B” in the model number stands for “ball baring” meaning that this engine has ball bearings, and the “S” stands for “suction type carb.” hence the “Vacu-Jet” carburator. This is one of the earlier engines featuring a rope recoil start. A great engine painted in its’ original color, leading me to believe this engine was off a Eclipse reel mower. It is a great runner as well, and with it mounted on one of my display boards it makes for a awesome presentation at the engine shows. I also use the surface of this display boards to place some engine data on it, to give the viewing public alittle information on the engine. Please watch in HD if you can, enjoy, rate, and comment. Please add me to your friends list and subscribe. Thanks, Enginenut 🙂

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46 Replies to “My restored 1951 Briggs & Stratton Model “6-B-S” gas engine”

  1. By looking at the serial number on the engine ID plate, then cross referencing the numbers on a small engine collectors web-site-ASECC-this site is awesome for information on these cool engines!

  2. What some people won't collect. I had one of these on a large commercial edger I bought for $15. The carb was cracked but it still started and ran like a top. It worked better than the newer smaller edger I bought for $35. I won't share any minibike horror stories here, but will say that is a nice restoration. The engine I had on the edger was super clean when I threw it away.

  3. Nice restoration! I have a 53 6s and I'm wondering do you run a lead additive in your gas? or did these engines run on unleaded gas back in there day? I'm not running any in mine because I figure its going to be a full restoration like yours and not ran that much.

  4. Hey, you seem like someone who might know a lot about Briggs & strattons 🙂
    I have an old generator that i bought, but i have no idea how old it is..
    IF you got the time, would you care to take a look at this video? /watch?v=xuY0wLC5aGo

  5. I get them off of Ebay, there is a fella in Bend, OR. that makes reproduction decals, they are awesome looking, I use them on almost all of my small engine restorations. Once on Ebay search "bladesmithbendor", best of luck!!!

  6. Thank you and ya I had three of them older motors and I built a mini chopper so I wanted to put an old reliable motor on it so my 93 year old pepere gave me the motors there all from about the same age but two needed block work and piston rings so I used the good block and now I just have to clean the points

  7. Hey, lucky what u got there, as the older briggs are just going up in value. I have a 1954 briggs 5s that I just got a carb for and an old 2hp tank would work, that's one of my favorite models because The lines on the shroud

  8. Where didya get the new stickers,,? And could ya let me know the "best" website for information on Briggs & Stratton,,?There are so many,,Love your lil engine,,I have several 3hp horizontals,,great running lil engines,,

  9. I get the decals off of Ebay, there is a fella in Bend, OR. that makes reproduction decals, they are awesome looking, I use them on almost all of my small engine restorations. Once on Ebay search "bladesmithbendor" For small engine information ASECC.com is the best on-line resource for most small engines! Best of luck on your engine restorations!

  10. I used a light grey primer, and Krylon "gloss green" paint. The finish still looks as good as the day I painted it, and has remained durable thru all of the engine shows it has went to-not to mention the hours of run time as well 🙂

  11. hey got a question about the engine where are the decals located other then the one on the blower housing and air cleaner, or is that it ?. I have the same engine basically but its a couple years newer. oh and the knurled  nut I found out was 8-32 thread if anyone is interested cause im doing the same.

  12. Enginenut,  6B-S….  "6"= (six cubic inch), "B"= Design (in this case Aluminum), "S"= Suction type carburetor.  This design did not have ball bearings during these years.
    The 6B Series was not introduced until 1953, it replaced the Model 6, a cast iron engine. The 6B series were made for 5 years. In late 1957 they were replaced by the 60000 series (2 HP) "Kool Bore" design.  Your engine was manufactured between 1953 – 1957. 

    Best Regards,
    Ken

  13. I just  love these  old  B&S  engines ,,I have several  model N , H and B engines and ,, numerous  larger cast  iron  engines  ranging  from  old  fire pumps to  grain  auger engines ,,, ,,I also  have a  very  nice collection  of  Wisconsin  engines  although none  are  restored    I have a couple of large  inline  4 engines which are  liquid cooled as well as numerous VH4D  V4 engines  and THD  side by side 2 cylinders ,,,these  monsters do all kinds of  tasks on my  farm too ,,I have  3  hand built tractors powered  by  VH4D wisconsins 

  14. Model ZZ from '46, idles at half the speed. broke the governor spring at one point and it never stalled without an idle screw! I love playing with these old engines!

  15. I have an old edger with a briggs &Stratton engine model number 6bs type number 901039 and I was hoping you could tell me where I might be able to find a carburetor sure would appreciate your help

  16. Your engine was not made in 1951, and has no ball bearing.
    It is the aluminum block model "6B" first sold in 1953. That one looks 1955 to 1958. You should ask someone who actually knows something about Briggs engines of the 1950s, since it is very obvious that you don't know what you have.

  17. Nice engine. I mow my lawn with an Eclipse rotary that has a 6b-h engine on it. The tappet clearances are loose and I was wondering if any cams, tappets or valves from any later Briggs engines would fit in it so I could tighten it up. Seems hard to find new parts for the engine on this mower. Thanks…

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