Two-stroke engine rebuild time-lapse – 1978 Kawasaki KE100 motorcycle | Redline Rebuild S2E2



Many of us remember the endless days of childhood summers, filled with ice-cream stained t-shirts and baseball cards chattering away in bicycle spokes. Longing to relive the summer when he finally retired his old bicycle, Davin Reckow invites gasoline to the nostalgia party with the Kawasaki KE100.

In this episode of Redline Rebuild, he rejuvenates the two-stroke motorcycle engine that served up freedom and independence for many young riders. Davin overhauls the dual-sport’s drivetrain, preparing, once again, to hit those Traverse City, Michigan, two-tracks.

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25 thoughts on “Two-stroke engine rebuild time-lapse – 1978 Kawasaki KE100 motorcycle | Redline Rebuild S2E2

  1. Rotary Valve 2 stroke Engines are the best!

    high horsepower for a small displacement air cooled engine
    with a low compression ratio

    I got a Suzuki GP 125 with a Performance Exhaust and a 28mm carburetor

    it makes around 20-25hp at the wheel

  2. I just noticed they're running their fuel line into the cases without a grommet. The stock bike would have had a smaller fuel line sealed tight by a grommet, because that entire cavity was part of the intake tract. Having the fuel line go in there unsealed means that it can suck dust and dirt in through there. If your air filter isn't flowing as well as it should, the suction inside that cavity can be surprisingly strong.

  3. Mine had hi..lo. Range. Great little bike. Had a lot of piston slap or similar noise but that went away when you put on ya helmet 😂😂🇦🇺

  4. Aaah.. I remember the smell of this bike, and the weird carburettor placement under the right engine cover, which I had to rebuild several times because some wanker put sugar in the tank every now and then.

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